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What's the name of this cast-on? - I know it's wonky and I don't care [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Kake

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What's the name of this cast-on? [Feb. 15th, 2007|06:59 pm]
Kake
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I wrote this description for asrana and now want to add it to the london.crafts wiki, but I'm not sure what this cast-on is actually called. Anyone know?

The cast-on:

Hold the needle with stitches already on in your right hand, with the end of yarn coming off it to the left:

Let the free end of yarn hang down, and put your left thumb behind it from left to right, ready to lift it upwards:

Use your left thumb to lift a loop of yarn up and behind the tip of the needle in your left hand:

Bring the needle tip backwards against the free end of yarn, and lift up a loop:

Leave this loop on the needle, pull your thumb out, pull the free end of yarn to tighten:

You have made a stitch! Repeat:

(Photos by rjw1; I know the last two are out of focus but I was too tired to get him to take them again.)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: katstevens
2007-02-15 07:39 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure, but this may be because I was distracted by the box of Cadbury's Heroes in the background.
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From: mzdt
2007-02-15 07:58 pm (UTC)
so was the camera!
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From: hatter
2007-02-15 09:37 pm (UTC)
Me three.
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[User Picture]From: nou
2007-02-16 01:51 pm (UTC)
Yay autofocus :)
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[User Picture]From: reuss
2007-02-15 07:43 pm (UTC)
I think that's called the single cast on, or "thumb method".
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[User Picture]From: nou
2007-02-16 01:56 pm (UTC)
“Thumb method” rather confuses me, since I think of it as a long-tail method, as Emma says below.
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[User Picture]From: emmacrew
2007-02-15 09:46 pm (UTC)
Backwards loop is most common in my experience, too. I've also seen the term "e-wrap" (mostly from Sally Melville and the Knitter's magazine folks, I guess it's supposed to look like a cursive e). I personally call it "half-hitch" because, well... it's a series of half-hitches.... but I don't think that's in common usage. And at least one source calls it "thumb method," which is confusing because there are also people who call one manner of doing long-tail the thumb method (as opposed to the "slingshot" method), which led to a very confused exchange in knitting a month or so ago.
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[User Picture]From: nou
2007-02-16 01:52 pm (UTC)
Thanks! Backwards loop was how I'd been thinking of it, but I wasn't sure if that came from knitting lore or from my own brain :)
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[User Picture]From: ghoti
2007-02-15 09:12 pm (UTC)
Backwards loop, and some of my children use it, but I have real difficulty knitting in to it.

I always use the type which knitty calls 'knitting on', purely because that's what my mother uses.
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[User Picture]From: nou
2007-02-16 02:01 pm (UTC)
I had to go and look up what knitting on is :) I find that kind of cast-on is quite tricky to do loosely enough.
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[User Picture]From: ghoti
2007-02-16 03:51 pm (UTC)
What cast-on do you use?
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[User Picture]From: nou
2007-02-16 08:01 pm (UTC)
My favourite one is a long-tail one that is either identical, or very similar, to the one gannet describes here (if I think too hard about it I stop being able to do it, so I can't say for sure that it's identical).
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[User Picture]From: weatherpixie
2007-02-15 09:18 pm (UTC)
I've no idea what its called, but its how I cast on ;)

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[User Picture]From: natf
2007-02-16 12:15 am (UTC)
I have no idea in knitting terms but as a knot it is a half hitch!
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[User Picture]From: natf
2007-02-16 12:16 am (UTC)
BTW can you recommend a good learn to knit book and pattern?
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[User Picture]From: susannahf
2007-02-16 12:54 am (UTC)
Having just bought it, stitch and bitch looks good (although I already know the basics so don't know how good it is at teaching). Has lots of easy starter patterns building up into more complex ones.

The best way to learn is to find someone to teach you the absolute basics (cast on/off, knit/purl, increase/decrease). Then you can use a book to remind you.
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[User Picture]From: natf
2007-02-16 07:33 pm (UTC)
I have kniotted before and so only really need a refresher course and some simple patterns so this sounds ideal!

/me searches amazon
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[User Picture]From: susannahf
2007-02-16 07:50 pm (UTC)
The one I have is "the knitter's handbook" (the top one on that page)
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[User Picture]From: nou
2007-02-16 02:04 pm (UTC)
I've heard good things about Sally Melville's books, The Knit Stitch and The Purl Stitch.

Have I already told you about london.crafts? I've learned a lot from people on that list. And weatherpixie, who knows EVERYTHING, is on it!
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[User Picture]From: natf
2007-02-16 07:37 pm (UTC)
Thanks and yes.
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